Did I Ovulate or Not? Five Signs Ovulation is Over

by | May 7, 2020

We’ve talked a lot about ovulation on this blog — including signs of late ovulation and reasons you might not be ovulating at all. But since tracking your ovulation is one of the most important things you can do while you are trying to get pregnant, naturally, you may have more questions about your ovulation phase, like how to tell if you’ve ovulated at all.

 

We’ve talked a lot about ovulation on this blog — including signs of late ovulation and reasons you might not be ovulating at all. But since tracking your ovulation is one of the most important things you can do while you are trying to get pregnant, naturally, you may have more questions about your ovulation phase, like how to tell if you’ve ovulated at all.

As you already know, the ovulation phase is short, lasting just 12 to 24 hours. In a healthy menstrual cycle, ovulation occurs when the dominant follicle (which grew during the follicular phase) breaks and releases an egg, which travels through the fallopian tubes to the uterus. If this egg is not fertilized, the egg dies and the uterine lining is shed during menstruation.

Because ovulation is so short, you have a limited window during which you can get pregnant. That’s why it’s critical to recognize when you are ovulating so you can increase your chance of getting pregnant. So, how can you tell if you are done ovulating once ovulation begins? Here are five sure signs that ovulation is over.

1. Changes in the Consistency of Cervical Mucus

Throughout most of the month, your cervical mucus is thick and creamy, appearing as a white or whitish-yellow color. However, when you are ovulating, your cervical mucus becomes clear and slippery, much like the consistency of an egg white.

When you are done ovulating, you will see a shift in your cervical mucus from this slippery consistency back to the thick, creamy consistency of before. Using a tracking tool like the Mira App’s advanced calendar can help you get in touch with the consistency of your cervical mucus to better recognize when ovulation begins and ends.

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2. Changes in Basal Body Temperature (BBT)

One of the most surefire ways to know if you’ve ovulated is to track your Basal Body Temperature, or BBT, each day before getting out of bed. As you approach ovulation, changing hormone levels lead to a spike in body temperature.

You are most fertile during the days that your temperature has peaked. By the time you watch your temperature fall again, it’s likely too late to conceive and your ovulation is probably over. Recording your temperature every day with a basal thermometer will help you recognize the patterns in your body temperature before your next cycle, so you can increase your chance of getting pregnant next month.

3. Changes in Urine Hormone Concentration

You know that your hormones fluctuate throughout the menstrual cycle, but did you know you can measure these changes through your urine? If you aren’t yet a Mira user, here’s a bit about how our tracking tool works: first, immerse the test wand into urine for 10 seconds. Then, insert the test wand into Mira. Through the Mira App on your smartphone, you can view the concentration of hormones in your urine to help you analyze your fertility.

10 to 12 hours prior to ovulation, you should see a surge in luteinizing hormone, which triggers the release of an egg. After ovulation is over, luteinizing hormone levels drop, while estrogen levels increase. Mira can track all of these changes through your urine to help you recognize when ovulation begins and ends and increase your chance of getting pregnant.

4. Changes in the Position of the Cervix

While you are ovulating, you may find that your cervix becomes higher, softer and more open to prepare for the release of an egg. After ovulation is over, your cervix will feel harder, like touching the tip of your nose.

If you feel comfortable, you can use a finger to gently check your cervix for changes prior to and following ovulation. You can do so by standing in whatever position you use to put in a tampon and inserting a finger to feel for your cervix. The Mira App’s advanced calendar can help you keep track of changes you feel surrounding ovulation to help you better predict when you are ovulating during your next menstrual cycle.

5. Changes in Libido

Many women experience changes in libido, or sex drive, throughout the menstrual cycle. You may find that you are most interested in sex when you are most fertile, during the week surrounding ovulation. This is Mother Nature’s way of ensuring the continuation of the species by encouraging you to have sex when you have the greatest chance of getting pregnant!

If you are someone who notices an increase in libido around ovulation, then a decrease in libido shortly after may signify that you are finished ovulating. We recommend using a tool like the Mira App’s advanced calendar to keep track of your libido if you would like to use libido to estimate when you are ovulating.

Tracking your ovulation is an important component of fertility planning. We hope this article has given you tools and data points you can use to better recognize the start and end of ovulation, so you can predict when you are ready to ovulate during your next cycle — and prepare to conceive during this time.

✔️ Medically Reviewed by Dr Roohi Jeelani, MD, FACOG and Lauren Grimm, MA

roohi jeelaniDr Roohi Jeelani is Director of Research and Education at Vios Fertility Institute in Chicago, Illinois. Dr Jeelani earned her medical degree from Ross University School of Medicine in Portsmouth, Dominica. She then completed a residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology and a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Wayne State University, Detroit Medical Center, where she was awarded a Women’s Reproductive Health NIH K12 Research Grant. She is board certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr Jeelani has authored numerous articles and abstracts in peer-reviewed journals, and presented her research at national and international scientific meetings. A Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dr Jeelani is a member of the American Medical Association, the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, and the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists.

Lauren Grimm is Research Coordinator at Vios Fertility Institute in Chicago, Illinois. Lauren earned her bachelor’s degree from Loyola University Chicago, where she also completed her masters in Medical Sciences. Lauren has worked alongside Dr. Jeelani for the last 3 years, authoring a number of abstracts and articles in peer-reviewed journals, and presented her research at national and international scientific conferences. Lauren will be continuing her education this fall at Rush University Medical College in Chicago, IL as an MD candidate.

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Ready to easily, precisely, and automatically track your ovulation cycles? Let Mira take the guesswork out of getting pregnant, so you know exactly when to conceive.

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