PCOS 101: What is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?

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Whether it’s been three months or several years, trying to conceive and still not pregnant is dishearting, especially if you’ve been diagnosed with PCOS.

Affecting 10 percent of women, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common causes of infertility in women. Women with PCOS often have polycystic ovaries. This means that the ovaries have many tiny, benign and painless cysts. During an ultrasound, the tiny cysts may resemble a string of pearls. Or, women with PCOS may have high testosterone or lack of ovulation (irregular or no period).

While it can be frustrating and disheartening when diagnosed with PCOS, it’s not the end of trying to conceive. Remember, you have to ovulate to get pregnant and there are ways to get your body to ovulate. If you have PCOS, one of the best things you can do is to educate yourself and be proactive about your health. That means working with your doctor, maybe taking medication, and changing your diet.

Discover the facts about PCOS, what you can do if you’re diagnosed to help your body conceive.

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Infographic: What is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and What You Should Know

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